“The Color Of Water” A Black Mans’s Tribute to His White Mother

As a boy in Brooklyn’s Red Hook projects, James Mcbride knew his mother was different. But when he asked about it, She’d simply say” I’m light-skinned”  later he wondered if he was different, too, and asked his mother if he was black or white. “You ‘re a human being, she snapped. Educate yourself or you’ll be a nobody” And when James asked her what color God was, she said “God is the color of water”… As an adult, Mcbride finally persuaded his mother to tell her story-the story of a rabbi’s daughter born in Poland and raised in the South, who fled to Harlem, married a black man, founded a Baptist church, and put twelve children through college. The Color Of Water is James Mcbride’s tribute to his remarkable,eccentric, determined mother-and an eloquent exploration of what family really means.

Hello TTT Ladies,

” The Color Of Water”  A Black Mans Tribute to His White Mother will be facilitated by Beth Williams on Febraury 26, 2013 6:30pm at the Augusta Richomd County Public Library 823 Telfair St, Augusta, GA 30901.

I thank you in advance for your support to Talk The Talk Ladies Book Club

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5 thoughts on ““The Color Of Water” A Black Mans’s Tribute to His White Mother

  1. Hello TTT Ladies,

    I hope you are enjoy reading “The Color Of Water” by James Mcbride

    This question is adressed to “QueenWilliams” who selected this book.

    Why did you choose this book? and what impact do you think it will have on
    the forth coming discussion?

    I will start reading this book tonight, and I look forward to a “adventure”!!!!

  2. Hello TTT Ladies,

    I don’t know about you but I had a wonderful time, all of our TTT Ladies were present, the food was excellent, the conversation was exciting.

    “The Color Of Water” by James Mcbride, the title of the novel is just as prolific as the novel. After reading this book I can understand why he wanted to honor his mother. His mother’s past was his future, this was apparent because of his strong desire to connect to who she really was. He was looking for himself and realized the missing part was his mother.

    The question asked was why did she keep her history to herself? I personally felt she was trying to feed twelve children, so getting keeping food on the table and the rent paid was more of a priority. In all honesty I can remember having those same feelings,and I only had one son. In fact he asked the same questions as a adult. I felt well I have rasied you to be a product of society in instead of a menace. I really felt that my past was irrelevant.

    TTT Ladies I was sincerely wrong, there was a void in our relationship, my actions proved I was his mother, but that was not enough, he needed to know me as person. That was one of hardest converstions I have ever had, but what is so ironic it is very easy for me to talk to family, friends, and the TTT Ladies. So really talking to my son should have been as natural as child birth. I am still revealing and sharing, but it is still difficult for me.

    Sometimes I feel as parent’s we are “grown kids” that put our hurts to the side so we can raise our children.

    I wonder when all of her children were grown did she sit on the side of her bed and ask her self “Who am I?

    Thank you QueenWilliams for chosing a book that promotes self reflection, I know as a parent I played the cards that life dealed, and so did Ruth Mcbride.

    ,

    • I also, enjoyed our discussion last night. Lots of good opinions and feelings were shared. Ruth McBride Jordan was a unique person and an unconventional parent. I’m glad to know her story mirrors your experience with your son. You’re right; James McBride honored his mother quite well with this book. Her legacy lives on …

    • I also, enjoyed our discussion last night. Lots of good opinions and feelings were shared. Ruth McBride Jordan was a unique person and an unconventional parent. I’m glad to know her story mirrors your experience with your son. You’re right; James McBride honored his mother quite well with this book. Her legacy lives on …

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